Research

My current research focuses on issues of nationality, ethnicity, citizenship, identity politics, language politics, and representation.  I also have experiential and scholarly interest in understanding political and social revolutions, having been resident in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan through the events of the 2005 Tulip Revolution.

My dissertation leverages both normative political philosophy and comparative methodology to examine the relationship between civic identity, ethnic identity, and language choice, focusing on ethnic Russian and ethnic Kazakh citizens of Kazakhstan.  Survey and interview-based fieldwork for this project was conducted between 2012-2014 at various sites in Kazakhstan.

My MA thesis (Central Eurasian Studies, 2008) examines the intersection of nationality and political identity in Kyrgyzstan’s Tulip Revolution.

My conference papers and other presentations reflect these research interests as outlined above. A selected list of these works is below:

 “Analyzing Multiethnic Societies: Normative Frameworks in Kazakhstan, the US and the European Union,” invited presentation at the International Theoretical and Practical Conference “Independence and the Leader of the Nation,” Academy of Public Administration under the President of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Astana, Kazakhstan, December 11th 2012

 “Human Rights in Central Asia,” invited presentation at the 2011 Institute for Curriculum and Campus Internationalization, Indiana University, Bloomington, May 23rd, 2011

 “Minority Nationality Representation in Kyrgyzstan: Uzbeks and the State under Akaev and Bakiev,” presented at the 15th Annual Convention of the Association for Studies of Nationalities, April 16th 2010, Columbia University, New York.

“Managing Minority Representation: The Assembly of the People of Kazakhstan,” presented at the 17th Annual Conference of the Association of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, March 6th 2010, Indiana University, Bloomington.

 “Kazakhstan & Standard 10,” presented as part of the Geography and History of the World: States, Nations, and Nation-States workshops for high school teachers in southern Indiana, Fall 2008.

 “Reconsidering the Tarikh-i Churas,” presented (with Brian Cwiek) at the 15th Annual Conference of the Association of Central Eurasian Students at Indiana University, March 22, 2008, Indiana University, Bloomington